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Prince Consort's statue unveiling

Explore how Albert was memorialised across art forms

Portraiture and Works of Art

Queen Victoria supported photography as both an art form and tool for communication from its inception. She became highly skilled at using photography to navigate the conflicting demands of her public and private self, as monarch, wife and mother. Following Prince Albert’s death in 1861, Victoria’s inconsolable grief led her to retreat from public life. Photography, and its dissemination through popular and affordable collectible formats, allowed her likeness to be present despite her physical absence from public life. Photographic family portraits from this period often included William Theed’s posthumous bust of Prince Albert, used as a compositional device to emphasise his continued influence. In addition, a range of artistry was employed to commemorate Prince Albert, seen in the selected works on paper, paintings and sculpture below.