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Victoria commissioned works that memorialised her beloved husband

Decorative objects

In the nineteenth century, mourning objects took many forms. However, the most common form was jewellery, often set with a lock of human hair. For example, this can be seen in Queen Victoria’s Locket , which opens to reveal hair on one side and a photograph of Prince Albert (1819-61) on the other. Onyx, jet and black enamel were frequently used as materials in mourning jewellery. Queen Victoria gave gifts of jewellery to her grandchildren, which included Prince Albert’s portrait or suitable inscriptions in order for them to remember their grandfather. The death of public figures also often generated the commercial production of affordable memorial objects, such as tape measures and other accessories.

Attributed to John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813-1901)

Mourning ring with a microphotograph of Prince Albert (1819-61)

Camille Silvy (1834-1910)

Pendant

Camille Silvy (1834-1910)

Queen Victoria's Locket

Camille Silvy (1834-1910)

Locket

John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813-1901)

Prince Albert (1819-61) ornament

John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813-1901)

Memorial tape measure

John Jabez Edwin Mayall (1813-1901)

Memorial tape measure

Alexander Lamont Henderson (1838-1907)

Pendant with enamel of Prince Albert (1819-61)